This Layer of Dreams

On Caitlin Moran's Johnlock Scandal →

claudiaboleyn:

Why is it considered such a shameful, secret, sordid thing to ship Sherlock Holmes and John Watson?

Well, I suppose we all know why. Heteronormativity and the homophobia woven into the very fabric of this society.

But looking that tiny bit deeper, really thinking about it, how incredibly ugly is…

— 6 hours ago with 735 notes
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Moran may have wanted to tease the creative team: but Johnlock is no joking matter to Sherlock fandom.

Even more incendiary is the fact that it wasn’t just any woman being handed the microphone to discuss fandom with Cumberbatch, who frequently seems uncomfortable with the zeal of his fandom. Moran herself is a polarizing figure within the feminist community whose greatest hits include calling people “retards,” using the slur “tranny,” and famously declaring she “literally couldn’t give a shit” about the lack of minority representation on the tv show Girls.

Moran’s brand of self-centered feminism lies in sharp contrast to the predominantly female spaces of fandom, where women regularly debate privilege, embrace transgender and genderqueer characters, and genderflip and ‘racebend’ media like Sherlock so that the shows they love will, at least on some level, be more representative, diverse, and empowering for women and minorities. And for all that trotting out slash is the go-to gimmick when entertainment reporters want to discomfit their celebrity guests, slash fanfiction is very often smart, subversive, and transformative. At the very least it is one of the most interesting kinds of online writing in existence.

"
— 6 hours ago with 1410 notes
savvyliterate:

I can’t stop thinking about what Caitlin Moran did to humiliate a fanfic writer. I reblogged a post about it and walked away to clean the kitchen. As I inhaled the nontoxic fumes of Mrs. Meyers countertop spray, I got madder and madder.
The fic’s writer has addressed the situation, and her responses are classy as hell. I hope she sticks with her writing, because she is really good. I don’t normally seek out slash fic, but I began reading hers. She’s got the characters, the emotions, the situations nailed. Four for her.
But, then there’s the wider chilling effect of what Moran has done. Somewhere out there, there is a young adult who is reading about what happened that panel, watching the YouTube video. That person is probably looking at his or her writing and is suddenly terrified this will happen to them. After all, this interviewer had no qualms about doing it to someone else. That person might go to his or her Tumblr, Ao3 or wherever they have their stories posted and delete all their work, afraid they will be ridiculed. They will stop writing. They will stop creating.
This is what Caitlin Moran caused. It’s not just humiliating an author, making the actors and creators of “Sherlock” uncomfortable or going against her own words about feminism. It’s because what she did could influence someone to stop writing. What if we have lost out on some amazing work because a budding, insecure writer was scared off by Moran’s actions?
As a fanfic writer, this just makes me upset. But as a comic book writer, an author, a creator who came to my field because fanfic enabled me to hone my craft, this royally pisses me off.
To anyone reading this, who feels insecure after what happened at the Sherlock event, please don’t stop creating. Please don’t stop writing or drawing or creating beautiful cosplay or crafts. To quote Neil Gaiman, “Someone on the Internet thinks what you’re doing is stupid or evil or it’s all been done before? Make good art.”

savvyliterate:

I can’t stop thinking about what Caitlin Moran did to humiliate a fanfic writer. I reblogged a post about it and walked away to clean the kitchen. As I inhaled the nontoxic fumes of Mrs. Meyers countertop spray, I got madder and madder.

The fic’s writer has addressed the situation, and her responses are classy as hell. I hope she sticks with her writing, because she is really good. I don’t normally seek out slash fic, but I began reading hers. She’s got the characters, the emotions, the situations nailed. Four for her.

But, then there’s the wider chilling effect of what Moran has done. Somewhere out there, there is a young adult who is reading about what happened that panel, watching the YouTube video. That person is probably looking at his or her writing and is suddenly terrified this will happen to them. After all, this interviewer had no qualms about doing it to someone else. That person might go to his or her Tumblr, Ao3 or wherever they have their stories posted and delete all their work, afraid they will be ridiculed. They will stop writing. They will stop creating.

This is what Caitlin Moran caused. It’s not just humiliating an author, making the actors and creators of “Sherlock” uncomfortable or going against her own words about feminism. It’s because what she did could influence someone to stop writing. What if we have lost out on some amazing work because a budding, insecure writer was scared off by Moran’s actions?

As a fanfic writer, this just makes me upset. But as a comic book writer, an author, a creator who came to my field because fanfic enabled me to hone my craft, this royally pisses me off.

To anyone reading this, who feels insecure after what happened at the Sherlock event, please don’t stop creating. Please don’t stop writing or drawing or creating beautiful cosplay or crafts. To quote Neil Gaiman, “Someone on the Internet thinks what you’re doing is stupid or evil or it’s all been done before? Make good art.”

— 6 hours ago with 3785 notes
An Open Letter to Caitlin Moran

fireplum:

Dear Caitlin Moran,

Yesterday afternoon I was with my friend and looking through the list of people she follows on Twitter, and your name appeared. I had already heard about you, mostly because your books had been recommended to me. I wondered for a moment if I should follow you too - I’m shy about following celebrities but you’re the type of person someone like me, who likes to think herself a feminist, wouldn’t be ashamed to publically be interested in. My friend, in any case, spoke very highly of you. “And you know,” she told me, “she’s hosting the Q&A of The Empty Hearse BFI event today!”

It was only one more reason to envy you, a massively successful writer only a few years older than me, living a life of highbrow glamour at exclusive events, rubbing shoulders with interesting people. I was about to yield.

Alas, in our Internet age, what a difference a few hours makes.

In a rather spectacular manner, you managed to antagonise an entire fandom made up almost entirely of young, liberal-minded women like me, aka your core readership. How did you accomplish this? On paper, it doesn’t sound like much: you picked an erotic Sherlock fanfic off the Internet and made the stars of the show read an extract aloud for shits and giggles. But while it was most certainly shit, it wasn’t giggles for anyone, and least of all for us.

Read More

— 7 hours ago with 7345 notes
the-13th-floor:

“Beware of Artists” - Actual poster issued by Senator Joseph McCarthy in 1950s, at height of the red scare.

the-13th-floor:

“Beware of Artists” - Actual poster issued by Senator Joseph McCarthy in 1950s, at height of the red scare.

(via illecta)

— 7 hours ago with 97732 notes

 Utagawa Hiroshige, New Year’s Eve Foxfires (detail), 1857

 Utagawa Hiroshige, New Year’s Eve Foxfires (detail), 1857

(Source: brooklynmuseum.org, via jade-cooper)

— 7 hours ago with 4808 notes

Reactions to Joffrey being Joffrey during the Purple Wedding.

(Source: myackles, via nabokovsshadows)

— 1 day ago with 2595 notes

I want to see you pout, now.

(Source: austinlanghams, via eatacrocodile)

— 1 day ago with 716 notes
my dash did a thing

my dash did a thing

— 1 day ago
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Why was it so important to have Joffrey’s body in the scene?:

He is their first born. He is their sin. He is their lust, and their love – their everything. If he’s gone, what’s going to happen? Jaime is still trying to believe as hard as he possibly can that he’s in love with Cersei. He can’t admit that he is traumatized by his family and he’s been forced his whole life to be something he doesn’t want to be. What he is — but has to deny — is he is actually the good knight, like Brienne.

"

Alex Graves- director of Breaker of Chains

image

(via miltonsong)

— 1 day ago with 90 notes
#fuckin bullshit